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PNW Pioneer

‘Red’ alert, fox spotted on campus

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PNW’s fox, named “Red” by campus police, strolls around the Hammond campus near the police station.

PNW’s fox, named “Red” by campus police, strolls around the Hammond campus near the police station.

Photo provided.

Photo provided.

PNW’s fox, named “Red” by campus police, strolls around the Hammond campus near the police station.

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Several members of the PNW community have reported seeing a fox on the Hammond campus.

Patricia Nowak, police chief, confirmed the fox is living on campus but did not disclose the location in order to prevent anyone from bothering it. She said the campus police are calling the fox “Red.”

Nowak said this is not the first time a fox has been spotted on campus and that the mother lived on campus a year ago and two brothers have been around campus since early summer as well.

Kimee Mooney, sophomore communication major, said she spotted the fox on campus when she was with another student.

“I was shocked that he was so close to the students at school,” Mooney said.

Nowak said the fox is not dangerous on its own, but like any wild animal it can be if provoked.

“If the fox approaches any of our students, faculty or staff they should just leave it alone. They should not feed or attempt to capture the fox. The fox would be dangerous if it was threatened,” Nowak said.

Mooney said the encounter did not make her feel unsafe.

“I don’t think the fox is in any way a danger to the students. I am worried that the fox might interfere with traffic and might get struck,” Mooney said.

Nowak said the fox may have been injured on campus.

“The fox is limping. One of his rear legs may be broken. However, he seems to be getting along well,” Nowak said.

Native Animal Rescue, a private, non-profit organization dedicated to the rehabilitation and release of wildlife, said it is best to leave injured adult wildlife alone because capturing them can lead to further injury and it is likely it will heal or adapt on its own.

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